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Paducah Snowfall Analysis

March 13, 2010

I dug this little alarmist gem up from 2006 recently and resolved to follow it up at some stage:

http://www.sciencedaily.com/videos/2006/0205-harder_rain_more_snow.htm

Some selected quotes from this article:

“scientists predict severe weather events will be even more extreme over the next few decades — more snow, harder rain, and hotter heat waves.”

Bizarrely, the article then quotes local residents who contradict both the un-named scientists view, and the article headline…..

People everywhere are noticing the changes in climate. Susan Decker, from Broomfield, Colo., says, “It seems warmer. Not as cold. We don’t get the snow anymore.”

Rob Topolski, from Paducah, Ky., says, “We also don’t have not nearly as much snow as we used to in Kentucky.”

Hmm, ok so the scientists say there is more snow, the people on the ground less..

So its as clear as mud then. So lets dig a bit deeper!

From Wikipedia, regarding Paducah, Kentucky:

“Notable snowstorms are the Great Blizzard of 1978, and the Pre-Christmas 2004 snowstorm. Many snowstorms also hit the area during the very snowy winter of 2002-2003.”

So notable snowfall has apparently happened recently according to someone. R0b Toploski seems to have a very, very short memory speaking in 2006, as he evidently does not remember the apparent heavy snow in 2002, 2003 and 2004.

Perhaps he just moved there?

So lets take a look at the scientists claim that actually,  snowfall is increasing generally.

There are two contradictory messages relating to northern hemisphere snowfall relating to climate change.  One group of scientists is saying snow will become a thing of the past.  back in 2000 Dr David Viner of the UEA CRU was famously quoted as saying:

(snowfall will become) “a very rare and exciting event. Children just aren’t going to know what snow is.”

He also said:

“We’re really going to get caught out. Snow will probably cause chaos in 20 years time.”

Well actually it was ten years not twenty.  But as the UK has always been “caught out” by heavy snowfall I could never understand the point he was making.

More recently we are told that warmer temperatures means more precipitation and more snow.

So are we experiencing more snowfall as we are now being told by Climate scientists?  Are the people of Paducah not seeing the snow falling around them. or do they know something the climate scientists do not?

So, lets look at Paducah, Kentucky. After an email to the Paducah weather station I received full data for 1963-2009 for average annual snowfall.

Numbers on the left of the graph are annual snowfall totals in inches.



See any increasing snowfall levels indicating what the “scientists” are claiming”?

Nope, me neither.

In Paducah there is a clear downwards trend since the early 1960’s, but certainly nothing life-changing, and certainly not an increase in recent years.

Perhaps the people on the spot know more than the scientists after all.

Year Av Ann
1963-64 15.1
1964-65 19
1965-66 5
1966-67 17
1967-68 14.5
1968-69 9.3
1969-70 21.1
1970-71 13.7
1971-72 2
1972-73 2.6
1973-74 3.8
1974-75 9.9
1975-76 5.5
1976-77 12.5
1977-78 35.7
1978-79 24.5
1979-80 14.9
1980-81 7.5
1981-82 9.2
1982-83 1.9
1983-84 16.9
1984-85 28.7
1985-86 10.9
1986-87 5.4
1987-88 10.6
1988-89 5.8
1989-90 3.5
1990-91 3.6
1991-92 0
1992-93 19.3
1993-94 18.7
1994-95 2.1
1995-96 12.8
1996-97 11.5
1997-98 3
1998-99 2.9
1999-2000 3.5
2000-01 8.5
2001-02 7.8
2002-03 23.9
2003-04 2.8
2004-05 14.2
2005-06 9
2006-07 2.5
2007-08 5.4
2008-09 3.7
2009-10 10.3
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From → BBC Climate Bias

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